TRIPTYKON’S Tomas Gabriel Fischer: “This Group Sounds Like No Other”

Saturday, 27th July 2013

TRIPTYKON mainman Tomas Gabriel Fischer (ex-CELTIC FROST, HELLHAMMER) has issued the following update on the progress of the band’s forthcoming follow-up to 2010’s Eparistera Daimones:

“TRIPTYKON’s current rehearsal and arrangement sessions for the forthcoming second album sound sweepingly heavy, epic, and dark. And utterly diverse. Such music — and, indeed, the experience of creating it — is deeply alluring, even addictive.

“The path leading to this point has been unexpectedly long and extremely challenging, even if for reasons largely unrelated to the group. And yet, we are reminded every time we meet why we have persisted. Love TRIPTYKON or feel profound hatred for us, but this group sounds like no other — except the two from which we have arisen.

“It will still be a few months until the music that is ‘Daemon,’ ‘Into Despair,’ ‘Sycophant,’ ‘Boleskine House,’ ‘Tree Of Suffocated Souls,’ and many more, will be committed to the album proper. But having progressed, finally, so far into the process in this manner is moving beyond description.”

Regarding the approach to his guitar playing on the new TRIPTYKON material, Fischer previously said: “My guitar tone/sound will likely continue to evolve, albeit within the limits of a certain direction.

“My current guitar tone is the result of a continuous effort to achieve a tone which represents me, i.e., my emotional landscape, perfectly. I have never been able to identify more with my guitar tone than in recent years (on ‘Monotheist’ and, particularly, Eparistera Daimones and the associated tours). I have spent some three decades pursuing this a tone/sound, and I feel extremely comfortable with it now, and I see little impetus to change it at this time. Above all, it yields the heaviness and darkness I seek. To me, this type of a continuous mutation within a certain frame of mind can best be explained when one looks at the three consecutive versions of the song ‘Triumph Of Death’… The simple reason is that I am not ‘youthful’ anymore at this point in my life, and it is logical that my music and approach is thus different. I will turn 50 this year, and it would be utterly naive to expect that my sound is exactly the same 31 years after I started HELLHAMMER as a teenager. If it was, it would be an act, i.e., a lie… My ‘aggression’ is [still] there. It has changed, though. It is of a very different kind nowadays. If anything, it is far more profound.”