Now You Know: Dialith

Monday, 24th July 2017

Formation: 2015
Location: Hudson Valley New York/Connecticut
Style: Symphonic/power metal
Personnel: Krista Sion (Vocals); Alasdair Wallace Mackie (Guitar); Mark Grey (Bass); Charles Woodruff (Keyboards) Cullen Mitchell (Drums)
Latest Release: Through Stone EP, 2017 (Self-Released)

As the band states below, it’s an exciting and changing landscape for music. For instance, this scribe discovered Dialith through a posting on a metal Facebook group which led to their Bandcamp page. Bands have access more outlets to release their music, but they also face more competition in reaching an audience’s ears.

Luckily, in Dialith’s case, they play to a wide potential audience. Krista Sion’s vocals have a powerful range to them, able to pull off a more rock-oriented approach just as easily as a more operatic one. Chock-full of solid riffage and melodies that support a diverse palette of heavy metal, symphonic, and gothic tones. Their recently released three song EP resonated with a few staffers, so we fired off some questions to the band, who responded collectively. So take a few moments and introduce yourself to a band who should be making a rise through the ranks moving forward.

Dead Rhetoric: Where does the name Dialith stem from?

Dialith: It’s a word we created from Greek roots, meaning Through Stone, which is where we got the title of the EP from! It’s meant to evoke an image of nature’s perseverance through human constructs.

Dead Rhetoric: How do you describe the sound that Dialith has to someone unfamiliar with you?

Dialith: We would consider ourselves traditional heavy metal with modern elements, with added symphonic orchestrations and a focus on melody. If Evanescence and Iron Maiden had a baby, and the baby really liked Hans Zimmer, that would be Dialith!

Dead Rhetoric: Is there anything particular that you feel allows Dialith to stand out from the crowd?

Dialith: We seek to be a throwback to the old days with exclusively clean vocals, a big focus on guitar riffs, and showcasing dynamics. We’ll break away from the heavier stuff with ballads and softer, catchier songs, which leaves a greater impact when we return to the fast, heavy riffs.

Dead Rhetoric: Who are some of the influences that the band has, collectively-speaking?

Dialith: Composition-wise, we’re huge fans of bands like Nightwish, Epica, Kamelot, and Fleshgod Apocalypse, while taking guitar inspiration from bands like Arch Enemy and Nevermore. We also really enjoy film score from composers such as Hans Zimmer, Bear McCreary, and John Williams.

Dead Rhetoric: You’ve just released your first EP, Through Stone. Was there anything in particular you learned through the recording process?

Dialith: This was our first ever experience recording in a studio, and we quickly discovered the enormous amount of prep-work to get to the final result, but we’re delighted with the outcome! We also realized how technology can be a tremendous asset to recording each song: All guitars and bass were recorded at home with direct tracks, and we could produce a rough draft by ourselves and know what the song should sound like before even setting foot in the studio

Dead Rhetoric: Are you happy with the reception so far?

Dialith: We’ve loved the positive feedback from not only our family and friends, but new fans as well. We can’t wait to bring everyone more!

Dead Rhetoric: There are three songs on the EP, but scrolling through your Facebook it appears you have more written. Any plans for future material?

Dialith: Absolutely! We’re planning on releasing our first full-length next year, and 7 songs are already written. There’s going to be all kinds of different experiences we want to bring to people, with a ballad, folk elements, and even more symphonic compositions. What we’re most excited is the final song, which will be an extended grand finale to close off the album with a high-concept storyline and a full orchestral score. We’re keeping the specific details of that song under wraps for now.

Dead Rhetoric: There’s a lyric video for “Quiver of Deception” that was just released. Any particular meaning to the mirrors that are seen throughout the video?

Dialith: We gave the video maker creative freedom, allowing their own interpretation of the lyrics to come to life. The floating mirrors tie into the words “smoke and mirrors breathe”, which deals with deception and self-reflection.

Dead Rhetoric: What are some of the band’s goals at the moment?

Dialith: Now that Mark and Charlie have joined us, we have a full lineup for the first time ever! Our top priority is to book some shows throughout the rest of the year and build our fanbase. Once the new year rolls around we will focus on writing and recording for the full-length album.

Dead Rhetoric: What do you think is the toughest part about being a young band trying to get their music out there today?

Dialith: New bands have a tough time getting by without connections, and we have to compete with other forms of entertainment such as Netflix and video games when trying to draw a crowd for a live show.

Dead Rhetoric: On the other hand, do you feel that services like Bandcamp and YouTube have been an easier way to get your music out there?

Dialith: Bandcamp has been a tremendous boon to us, it allows us to easily distribute our music to the world and we’ve had strangers across the globe stumble upon us using Bandcamp’s ‘Discover’ feature. For other bands, YouTube has allowed individuals to build a fanbase through other means than just releasing music, such as Ola Englund with his gear demos, or Jared Dines with his comedy videos. By providing a ‘service’ in a way to their fans, they have been able to funnel that following into very successful musical careers. It’s an exciting, changing world for music!

Dead Rhetoric: What’s Dialith up to in the next six months or so?

Dialith: You’ll be able to catch us live hopefully as early as September! We’re talking with promoters in the tri-state area as well as New England and we’re eager to hit the road.

Dialith on Facebook